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When it comes to getting a job, nice guys finish last.

According to our recent survey about perceptions at a job interview, we discovered that less attractive people were more likely to be given lower status personality traits, such as ‘hardworking’ and ‘trustworthy’, whereas more attractive people are more likely to be assigned higher status traits, such as ‘intelligent’, ‘ambitious’ and ‘confident’.

The results also revealed that nearly three-quarters of the British public (72%) believes that beauty bias in the workplace – whereby individuals are discriminated against on the basis on how attractive they are perceived to be – is still very much alive and kicking.

As such, one-fifth said they were considering a cosmetic procedure in the future in order to improve their career prospects.

But is cosmetic surgery the only solution?

To help you consider all of your options before turning to a surgical procedure, we asked some experts on how best to overcome the beauty bias at work in order to both get the job you deserve, and help you improve your career along the way.

The job interview

Greeting your interview panel with a smile is essential, according to body language expert Elizabeth Kuhnke. She said: “A warm, welcoming smile wins hearts and minds.

“When listening, lean towards the other person, without invading their space. Use open body language, breathe from your core and act with authority.”

Mirroring body language is also a good way to break down barriers between yourself and the interview panel. Elizabeth said: “Notice how the other person behaves and work to mirror and match their behaviour – by creating a physical rapport you can develop trust and the interviewer will appreciate that you are on the same wave length, and he or she will feel a connection with you.”

Most importantly, she added: “Don’t be untrue to who you are, just treat the other person with respect, establish rapport, and be prepared to produce outstanding results.”

Improve your career

Psychologist Dr John Mervyn-Smith, believes that if you want to get ahead at work, get that raise or achieve that promotion, it is vitally important to demonstrate the positive impact you have on the company to your seniors.

He said: “If you can demonstrate the positive impact you are having with regards to a task, role, project, team or the organisation you should be onto a winner.”

Being proactive in your quest to improve your workplace prospects is also important. Dr Mervyn-Smith added: “Talk to your manager to discuss expectations and objectives so you are able to demonstrate your impact.”

By then achieving or exceeding these goals, you’ll be able to show beyond doubt your value to the company, which can in turn be used as evidence to support your ambitions for achieving that promotion or raise.

If you think you’ve been unfairly overlooked at work, he recommends taking it up with Human Resources or speaking with your manager – and go prepared. He said: “Make sure you provide examples of how you have contributed and supported the team or organisation in achieving objectives.”

Quash the beauty bias

By being prepared, proactive, and ready to demonstrate your value to the senior members of your workplace, the inherent beauty bias that could stand in the way of your career progression can be quashed.

As Ms Kuhnke says, “When you act as if you’re the right person for the job, others will believe that you are, too.”

How we can help

If you decided to undergo a cosmetic surgery or procedure in order to improve your career prospects and the treatment went wrong due to medical negligence, you may be able to make a claim for compensation.

Find out how we can help you today on a no win, no fee basis - get in touch by calling freephone on 0808 256 9318 or complete our online enquiry form to request a call back.

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