More and more men turn to cosmetic surgery

RECORD numbers of men are opting for cosmetic surgery to hold back the years, a new survey has revealed.

While women still make up the vast majority of plastic surgery patients, a fifth more men had procedures last year compared to 2006.

The audit, by the British Association of Aesthetic Plastic Surgeons, revealed that 32,453 cosmetic surgery operations were carried out on men and women in 2007. This figure was up 12.2 per cent on 2006.

The findings show that there is no longer a stigma attached to going under the surgeon’s knife for male patients.
There was a 61 per cent rise in the number of men having tummy tucks last year, while breast reductions for men surged by 27 per cent, with the 224 operations meaning a 10-fold increase since 2002.

The numbers having nose jobs also went up by more than a third, while male liposuction increased by 18 per cent in 12 months.

Meanwhile, the number of women undergoing facelifts has reached a record high, with 4,238 facelift operations in 2007 – a rise of 37 per cent on the previous year.

Breast enlargement remained the most common operation for women (6,497) in 2007, followed by eyelid surgery (5,148).

In contrast the nose job (716 procedures) was the most favoured operation for men, followed by liposuction (582) and eyelid surgery (558).

Analysts say that Britons spent more than £600 million on cosmetic surgery last year.

But when non-surgical treatments, such as Botox® and dermal fillers, are included, they predict that the market will top £1 billion over the coming 12 months.

While cosmetic surgery has become increasingly acceptable and more popular with both sexes, experts have warned patients to be wary of rushing into plastic surgery without proper consultations.

They say some unscrupulous surgeons and clinics are aggressively marketing cosmetic operations for financial gain, at the expense of their clients’ health.

Tanveer Jaleel, founder and senior partner at TJL Solicitors, said: ”Although women are still much more likely to have cosmetic surgery than men, it is increasing rapidly in popularity among male patients.

‘Demand for cosmetic surgery is on the increase and is becoming more acceptable among both sexes.

‘However, people should be wary of the marketing tactics employed by some clinics. We would urge patients to always ask for the credentials of the doctor or healthcare worker carrying out their consultation and check that the clinic is registered with the Healthcare Commission, to be assured of high patient care standards.

‘We are seeing horrific cases where people have suffered personal injury and trauma as a result of botched cosmetic surgery.

‘One of the biggest problems is that some clinics are putting profits before patients by cutting corners and employing doctors who may not have completed the relevant higher surgical training.

‘As a result, they may not be genuine experts in the field of cosmetic surgery, which can put people’s lives at risk.’