Women want cosmetic surgery to boost their self-confidence

WOMEN are undergoing more and more cosmetic surgery operations in order to boost their self-confidence, new research has found.

According to a new survey, one in three say they are going under the knife because they have low self-esteem and want to increase their confidence.

In contrast, one in six said they wanted plastic surgery because they were unhappy with their appearance.

The survey, carried out by a leading cosmetic surgery clinic, revealed that people are no longer ashamed to admit they have had cosmetic surgery.

Of the 2,000 men and women questioned, four-fifths said it was now socially acceptable to have an operation to improve their looks.

Three-quarters of women told the researchers that they were most unhappy with their expanding waistlines, while one in six said they worried about cellulite on their thighs.

Around 12 per cent said they would consider surgery on their breasts, while nearly one in 10 said they were concerned about losing their hair either as a result of stress, yo-yo dieting, or badly applied hair extensions.
Men too were concerned about getting fat, with 18 per cent worried about their flabby waists and eight per cent about their receeding hairlines.

Shami Choudry, of the Transform Cosmetic Surgery Group, which carried out the survey, said British men and women were influenced by television and media reports when it came to choosing cosmetic surgery.

"When American TV drama Nip/Tuck aired on British screens with it’s catchphrase ‘Tell me what you don’t like about yourself ‘ it caused a cosmetic surgery frenzy,’ she said.

"However the findings from this research prove that most women opt for treatment to enhance their confidence, rather than to simply improve their appearance."

Tanveer Jaleel, founder and partner at TJL Solicitors, said while cosmetic surgery was far more acceptable in 21st century Britain, people should think long and hard before going under the surgeon’s knife.

‘The rise in cosmetic surgery procedures continues to happen in this country at a rapid rate,’ Mr Jaleel said.

‘However, no operation should be entered into lightly. We have seen some dreadful cases where operations have gone wrong so it is essential people do their research and find a reputable surgeon before signing on the dotted line.’